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Monthly Archives: August 2010

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DOUGLAS SCHOLES

Replicas of garbage cast in beeswax

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The following images are the 18 replicas of garbage cast in beeswax that were deposited during Walk no. 1, day 1 & day 2 (August 14 & 15, 2010).

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DOUGLAS SCHOLES


Selection of images – inside the Roger-Paré building of the Granby Courthouse
The stained-glass is installed on three floors on the east side of the Courthouse

Title: Untitlted
Artist: Marcelle Ferron
Medium: Stained-glass
Date: 1979
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DOUGLAS SCHOLES

Public sculpture located in Granby, Québec, on rue Principale beside the United Church of Canada, Granby (near the corner of Dufferin Street).

Title: Renaissance I
Artist: René L’Heureux
Date: July 1986
Symbolism (as written on bronze plaque fixed to sculpture):
1) Sphere – Life
2) Closed Ring – Protection
3) Open Ring –  The opening onto the universe
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DOUGLAS SCHOLES

Walk no.1 – Day 2: August 15, 2010
Walk no. 1 – Day 1: August 14, 2010

SITE: Hwy 112 (rue Principale and rue Denison Est) within the Granby city limits, a distance of 13.6 kms. (See map)

ACTIONS: During the walk, Douglas Scholes picked up garbage and debris from the side of the road and replace them with replicas of garbage made from beeswax. Examples of the replicas include plastic water bottles, chip bags, disposable coffee/drink cups, etc.  The natural beeswax poses no environmental hazards. These symbolic actions remain nearly invisible.  Photo, video and text documentation are available on this site as well as the web site of the 3e Impérial


START: 10:30 am at the intersections of rue Principale and chemin St-Antoine.

FINISH: 6:00 pm at the east end Granby city limits.

THE WEATHER:  Lightly overcast – Day time high of 26°C – Relative humidity of (approx.) 43% – Light winds from the south-west.

EQUIPMENT / MATERIALS: Wagon; Cast beeswax replicas to replace garbage; Green garbage bags; Blue recycling bags; Map of Granby; Gloves & hat

TOTAL DISTANCE (Day 2): 5.6 kms

TOTAL NUMBER OF BEESWAX REPLICAS DEPOSITED: over 140 (there were many replicas that were not recorded when deposited)

TOTAL NUMBER OF GREEN GARBAGE BAGS FILLED: 6

TOTAL NUMBER OF BLUE BAGS (RECEYCLING) FILLED: 4


photo: Patrick Beaulieu


photo: Patrick Beaulieu


photo: Patrick Beaulieu



Renaissance I, 1986, by René L’Heureux (above)


Vision Commune, 1999, by Roger Lapalme (above)


Bust & plaque commemorating Horace Boivin, Mayoral visionary of Granby (above)


Untitled, 1979, by Marcelle Ferron. Stained-glass in the Roger-Paré building (above)


photo: Patrick Beaulieu


photo: Patrick Beaulieu


photo: Patrick Beaulieu


photo: Patrick Beaulieu


photo: Patrick Beaulieu

Walk no. 1 Day 1– August 14, 2010

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DOUGLAS SCHOLES

Bust of Horace Boivin by Paul Lancz
return to Day 2 – August 14, 2010

The Granby Zoo was founded by Mr. Pierre-Horace Boivin, a man who deeply influenced the course of the City of Granby’s history. Granby’s mayor (1939 to 1964) and one of its great industrialists, he also started up the City’s daily newspaper, La Voix de l’Est.

Pierre-Horace Boivin had always loved animals. As a youth he owned half a dozen dogs that he had trained. He then cared for horses and a goat born with only three legs. His collection gradually increased. He undertook the construction of the zoo shortly following his election as mayor of Granby. In 1944 he convinced three of his friends to give him a piece of land running along Bourget Street; it didn’t take long before the Granby Zoo was short on space. The need for this first expansion was due to Mr. Boivin’s habit of asking his hosts during his travels for an animal to place in his zoo.

Mr. Boivin had however found the perfect site: a piece of land that the Notre-Dame parish owned, in anticipation of having to expand their cemetery some day. He convinced the parish that this land would not be useful to them and succeeded in getting them to part with 60 acres. In 1953, the Zoo was officially transferred to the Granby Zoological Society, which then handled its management, its development and its move to the present site. The Zoo does not lack in anecdotes: Ambika, the baby elephant given to the children of Granby by Nehru; the beavers given to Prince Rainier as a wedding present; the orphaned giraffe from the Copenhagen Zoo adopted by the Granby Zoo…

For Mr. Boivin, each occasion was a good opportunity to highlight his city and enrich the Zoo’s population. Major construction projects multiplied, the zoo’s population diversified and the visitors poured in. The Granby Zoological Garden earned its stripes and became a major tourist attraction in Quebec.

The Granby Zoo celebrated its 50th birthday in 2003 but, sadly, without its founder who passed away in 1993. Nearly all the members of his family took part in the celebrations.

Text taken from the Granby Zoo Web site

Return to Walk no. 1 – Day 2: August 14, 2010